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Typhoon

On Wednesday the 21st of September, Typhoon Roke hit Japan and passed through the Kanto region. Just days after the previous typhoon that heavily affected eastern Japan, authorities have advised over a million people to evacuate their homes and regroup to shelters. Prior to its passage over Tokyo, the torrential rains and the winds reaching over 200 km/h had killed already for people.

Japan is well used to those violent meteorological events and Roke was the 15th typhoon of the year but even though the country and its inhabitants are well prepared to these occurrences, typhoons regularly claim lives and cause million of yens worth of damage.

Last Wednesday, train lines were forced to stop and roads were cut in order to avoid putting commuters in danger. Some street blocks were cut off electricity for a while and communications by phone often got patchy. Some people however were brave (or crazy?) enough to go out and take some footage.

Video of the streets of Tokyo during the typhoon filmed by jetdaisuke

I went for an evening stroll around Shibuya once the rain had calmed down and saw the thousands of commuters patiently waiting for the transports to resume.

pile of broken umbrellas in Shibuya station

Pile of broken umbrellas after the storm


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Guillaume Erard
Author: Guillaume ErardWebsite: http://www.guillaumeerard.com
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Founder of the site in 2007, Guillaume has a passion for Japanese culture and martial arts. After having practiced Judo during childhood, he started studying Aikido in 1996, and Daito-ryu Aiki-jujutsu in 2008. He currently holds the ranks of 4th Dan in Aikido (Aikikai) and 2nd Dan in Daito-ryu Aiki-jujutsu (Takumakai). Guillaume is also passionate about science and education and he holds a PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology since 2010. He currently lives in Tokyo and works as a consultant for medical research. > View Full Profile

Tagged under: typhoon Roke
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